Hell Money - Multiple Types Available

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Hell money (Chinese: 冥鈔; pinyin: míngchāo) is a form of joss paper printed to resemble legal tender bank notes.
The notes are not an official form of recognized currency or legal tender since their sole intended purpose is to be offered as burnt offerings to the deceased as a solution to resolve their assumed monetary problems in the afterlife. This ritual has been practiced by the modern Chinese and across East Asia since the late 19th century.
Early 20th century examples bore resemblance to minor commercial currency of the type issued by businesses across China until the mid-1940s.

The identification of this type of joss paper as "hell bank notes" or "hell money" is largely a Western construct, since these items are simply regarded as yet another form of joss paper (冥幣, 陰司紙, 紙錢, or 金紙) in East Asian cultures and have no special name or status.
While the custom of burning "hell bank notes" remains legal in China, the Ministry of Civil Affairs has as of 2006 banned the practice of "vulgar" burned offerings for the deceased. According to the Ministry, the ban on offerings such as paper "luxury villas, sedan cars, mistresses, and other messy sacrificial items" was part of an effort to eradicate "feudal" and superstitious behaviour.

Giving someone living "Hell bank notes" is considered a great insult. In fact, in some areas it is considered a curse calling the King of Hell to collect that personage.

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